This puts you at the same table as a startup founder…

Before, if you wanted to invest in a startup, you had to know a guy who knew a guy.

Just look at Saint Francis High School. Barry Eggers, a parent who was an advisor at the school’s venture-capital fund, noticed how his kids were glued to an app from a certain startup. His firm, Lightspeed Venture Partners, was the first investor in the startup and, at the urging of Eggers, the school made a $15,000 investment in the app company of its own.

That company was Snapchat.

That $15,000 investment? It was worth $34 million by March 2017.

Great story, but again – you had to know a guy who knew a guy. Or you had to have a net worth that topped $1 million to get in early.

Today, the tables have turned…

Your Own Private Deals

Thanks to changes in the law, you now have a chance to invest in startups just like insiders and accredited investors.

It’s called Regulation Crowdfunding (Reg CF), which came into effect on May 16, 2016, as part of the previously enacted Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act of 2012. It allows eligible companies to sell securities through crowdfunding.

One of the biggest appeals is that you’re building a relationship with a company that could see many rounds of funding well before it debuts on a major exchange.

In essence, that could mean the same type of access to the same potential opportunity as what the Saint Francis investment fund had.

But before taking advantage of Reg CF investing, it’s important to know a few details. There are some stipulations.

The Nitty Gritty of Reg CFs

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) states all transactions must take place online through an SEC-registered intermediary. This would essentially be a broker-dealer or a funding portal.

There’s also a cap on the funding a company can receive set at $1,070,000 for every 12-month period. However, the SEC is considering raising the cap to $5 million.

Additionally, there are limits on the amount of money an individual can invest across all offerings in a 12-month period, as well as caps based on an individual’s annual income.

These are as follows:


Source: https://www.sec.gov/info/smallbus/secg/rccomplianceguide-051316.htm
Click to enlarge
 

Lastly, the SEC requires disclosure of information in filings to all parties involved. This includes company board and business plan information and financial disclosures no older than 12 months. Additionally, a company must provide periodic updates on progress, annual reports and immediate updates to any changes in their deal offer.

These regulations offer investors much-needed transparency and are in place to protect you rather than limit your ability to see outsized gains.

In fact, we’re bringing two REG CF deals to the members of Cannabis Venture Syndicate in less than a week.

You can learn more about the ways you could use Reg CF and other strategies to make the most of your money, starting today.

Take care,


Comments

36 responses to “Everything You Need to Know About Reg CF Investing”

  1. Thank you, for this mail, i´m extremely interested…!!
    Please forward the opportunities when you can…
    best regards Leon.

  2. Thank you for this. Once the pandemic is over and I’m back making some money I’m all in on these investments. Your company, your service are truly bringing capitalism to the masses, the way it was intended in the first place.

  3. the two your looking at are they the only ones coming up this mouth or are you looking at more and when will we see them

  4. I have been crowdfunding since 2016. One of my private entity investments is during an IPO in July of this year, but may get pushed back until September, because of the COVID-19. Another is a VR company,
    that is moving right along with sales possibly hitting a million this year. There is another investment of a couple of a thousand dollars on my part that may result with a $371,800 payout. Lastly, I have my eyes on a crowdfunding real estate company that could possibly pay me out around $200,000.

  5. What has happen to Cannabis IPO. I thought that was what that program was? Or these two the same? Do I have to buy Venture program in order to get IPO’s

    • Hi Bill,

      Cannabis IPO Insider and Cannabis Venture Syndicate are two different services.

      IPOs focus on companies that are going public, and being traded on the public markets allows investors to move their money in and out of the stocks. Members of Cannabis IPO Insider can access our most recent IPO trade here – https://nicinvestors.com/subscription/cannabis-ipo-insider/alerts/putting-this-cannabis-cash-pile-to-work/

      We will also be sending out another IPO trade very soon.

      When you invest in a startup, you can not buy or sell shares like you do with IPOs and other stocks. Generally, a startup has to go public or be bought out for the value of your shares to increase.

  6. I would be very interested in this process. Please send step by step process on how this works and how to get it started.

  7. I am very interested in getting involved with this opportunity.
    Please add my name to future updates and send me pertinent information that I should know now.
    Thank you,
    Mike Davis, USMC Retired

  8. Tell me all about it. I’m ready to invest as soon as this virus situation is in hand. In fact, it would be advantageous to own BEFORE the vaccine is announced (and America will discover the vaccine first).

    • Hi Fitzgerald,

      Under the “My Dashboard” tab, you should see “Account Holder” with your name next to it. There should be an icon at the end of your name that you can click to look at your profile and update any information you need to change.

      If you need further assistance, our customer service number is 1-866-260-0361.

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