Here’s why I haven’t issued any cannabis tech recommendations yet – and the one exciting play that could make me change my mind…

I haven’t made any cannabis tech recommendations yet.

When it comes down to it, there haven’t been many tech breakthroughs yet.

When you consider supposedly new cannabis tech plays, ask yourself if what you’re looking at is actually cannabis tech.

For example, a company might come out with a special light that helps cannabis plants grow in a growhouse. That’s great, but if you can use that light to help grow tomatoes, is it really cannabis tech?

So far, this industry has helped advance existing technologies with applications outside of cannabis, but we’ve yet to see a cannabis-specific tech play that shows enough growth potential to catch my attention.

But that doesn’t mean we’ll never see a strong tech play in this sector.

In fact, there’s one interesting problem I’ve been keeping my eye on.

And whoever creates the technology that solves this problem will see massive profits…

A Driving Concern

For decades now, police forces have used breathalyzers – handheld devices that analyze the blood alcohol content (BAC) of suspected drunk drivers.

But there hasn’t been a similar way to test for cannabis use.

Numerous studies demonstrate that a cannabis high will impair a user’s ability to safely operate a motor vehicle in much the same way as alcohol.

Not that long ago, police could use blood tests to determine marijuana use. There would be no need to prove that the driver was intoxicated – a positive test could lead to drug charges.

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So why not use blood tests now? Well, there are a couple of very good reasons.

First, blood testing is a cumbersome process. Unlike breathalyzers, which can be used to test BAC on the side of a road, blood samples must be drawn in a lab and then sent off for testing.

Second, cannabis is detectable in blood for days after consumption – long after any effects wear off – so it’s not an accurate measure of whether the driver was impaired.

Fortunately, a few companies are working on a solution.

Cannabis Breathalyzers

A private, venture-backed company called Hound Labs recently announced that it has created the world’s first dual marijuana and alcohol breathalyzer.

Using this technology, police will be able to test for the presence of THC on a driver’s breath during routine traffic stops. This is a significant development, as THC will only linger on a user’s breath for a couple hours – the window in which driving skills would be impaired.

This technology is vital to the continued health of the cannabis industry, as it enforces accountability for responsible use.

The remaining problem is that no precedence has been set for what is a “safe” level of THC in relation to driving, but I expect standards to fall in place fairly quickly. Just as .08% is the legal limit for BAC, legislators will soon work with law enforcement officers to determine a solid limit for THC.

Hound Labs co-founder Mike Lynn says that law enforcement officers have been testing the company’s cannabis breathalyzer, and he hopes to begin selling the devices “later this year.”

But Hound Labs isn’t the only company with skin in the game.

In fact, our Elite Members just learned about a small, publicly traded company that’s developing its own version of this device.

Ultimately, it’s too early to say which company will win, and I still don’t think I’ll be issuing any official recommendations for tech plays in the near future.

But know that there will be a winner, and the Institute will be following developments in this technology very closely.

And when it does come time for me to issue a tech recommendation, make sure you’ll be there to get it.

Greg Miller
Executive Director, National Institute for Cannabis Investors

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Comments

13 responses to “The One Tech Play We’re Following”

  1. We actually have an investment called “ trutouch” which was a handheld DUI testing device. You put a finger in the device to test an alcohol level….it seems to be stalled out and not doing much but I wish they could tweak the tech to also address THC levels….such a great idea!

  2. Greg, good article on the marijuana testing…..I am retired from LE with over 35 years. Even after doing the testing it will take a long time for police departments to go on line is using such equipment. The first issue is cost since department budgets are controlled by city, county or state governments and replacement costs of current equipment such as vehicles, weapons, video cameras, etc strains budgets every year. The second issue once a new product gets purchased by a department is training of personnel on the equipment with written procedures in place including the cost of training. The third issue is proper care and documentation of maintenance records of the equipment and procedures in handling the tests and other documentation for evidence for court cases. The science behind the equipement and the use, care and training will be challenged in court. So, as with any new device that can be used it will be a while before it becomes mainstream, example; like the use of the taser. In the meantime officers will rely on current training and experience; ques and indicators for pc for a traffic stop and a good experienced officer will conduct and document his/her findings which will continue to hold up in court. . Hint, all that is needed is to be able to show that some sort of impairment occurred to cause the driver to swerve, drive with lights off, etc…part of the DUI paperwork will ask questions or at least the officer should ask; about medical history, current use of prescriptions and other legal and illegal drugs, last time the driver ate, hours of sleep etc. With the use of vapes and eatables it will be more challenging. I will be watching the studies and the companies you talked about very closely…..

  3. Thanks Greg, I actually bought this stock about 6 months ago as it sounded like something to have but I paid a lot more. I’m glad you wrote about it so I just added to it.

  4. IT WOULD BE FANTASTIC TO LEARN OF A COMPANY THAT COULD MEASURE THE THC LEVEL IN A TIMELY PERIOD .

    FRANKLIN ENGLISH

  5. I am highly interested, but I am new to this and it’s kind of confusing I don’t know anything about investing or how to do it , I was wondering if you can lend me a hand to get me on the right track I would appreciate it deeply . Thank you

  6. This device would have the potential to be used in many areas wherever sobriety is paramount to a safe working environment again the potential is much larger than just Road safety

  7. Hi Very new at this and very excited to make a good buy and watch it grow ..Will read all your info so i can become a good investor This is a great opportunity to have you there to help me Thank you .

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